mcri.edu.au.2Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.3Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Deakin University Geelong, VIC, Australia.4Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Deakin University Geelong, VIC, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.5Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Deakin University Geelong, VIC, Australia; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.6National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.7Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand.8Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics Unit, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.9School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.10Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics Unit, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.11Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.AbstractAIMS:

To determine the extent to which the transition to parenthood protects against heavy and problematic alcohol consumption in young men and women.

DESIGN:

Integrated participant-level data analysis from three population-based prospective Australasian cohort studies.

SETTING:

General community; participants from the Australian Temperament Study, the Christchurch Health and Development Study, and the Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study.

MEASUREMENTS:

Recent binge drinking, alcohol abuse/dependence and number of standard drinks consumed per occasion.

FINDINGS:

4015 participants (2151 females; 54%) were assessed on four occasions between ages 21 and 35. Compared to women with children aged Original article

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