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Opioid and Cannabis Use During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding in Relation to Sociodemographics and Mental Health Status: A Descriptive Study.

J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2020 Sep 30;:

Authors: Grywacheski V, Ali J, Baker MM, Gheorghe M, Wong SL, Orpana HM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study of Canadian women estimates the prevalence of opioid and cannabis use during pregnancy and cannabis use during the breastfeeding period and explores the sociodemographic and mental health characteristics associated with use.
METHODS: A total of 13 000 women who gave birth between January and June 2018 were invited to participate in the Survey on Maternal Health by Statistics Canada; 7111 women participated for a response rate of 54.7%. Participants were asked about their mental health, supports during pregnancy, and substance use. Multivariable logistic regression was used to describe the relationship between sociodemographic and mental health characteristics and substance use during pregnancy and while breastfeeding.
RESULTS: The prevalence of self-reported opioid use during pregnancy was 1.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1%-1.8%). A higher proportion of women reported using cannabis during pregnancy and while breastfeeding, at 3.1% (95% CI 2.5%-3.6%) and 2.6% (95% CI 2.1%-3.1%), respectively. Younger age, not being in a relationship, lower level of education, and thoughts of self-harm were significantly associated with cannabis use during pregnancy. Lower level of education and thoughts of self-harm were also significantly associated with cannabis use while breastfeeding, as were symptoms of postpartum depression and/or generalized anxiety. Lower level of education and symptoms of postpartum depression and/or generalized anxiety were also significantly associated with opioid use during pregnancy.
CONCLUSION: The results of this survey show relatively low levels of opioid and cannabis use during pregnancy and cannabis use while breastfeeding in Canada. Different sociodemographic and mental health characteristics are associated with the use of these substances, and public health interventions and policies should take into account these factors.

PMID: 33229280 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]


Source: ncbi 2

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Categories: Medical

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