Am J Health Promot. 2022 Jan 14:8901171211061941. doi: 10.1177/08901171211061941. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study examines the role of perceived parental knowledge on initiation of nicotine and cannabis vaping among youth.

DESIGN: Longitudinal study from a self-administered online survey. Three waves of data collected in 6-month intervals.

SETTING: 79 public and private schools in Texas.

PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents who self-reported never using e-cigarette to vape nicotine (n=1907; weighted sample [N] = 304371) or vape cannabis (n=2212; N=351955) at baseline. Participants were in 8th, 10th, and 12th grade at baseline.

MEASURES: Self-reported measures of nicotine and cannabis vaping.

ANALYSES: Weighted multivariate logistic regression models examined role of perceived parental knowledge at baseline (Spring 2016) as a predictor of nicotine and cannabis vaping initiation at 6-month (Fall 2016) and 12 month (Spring 2017) follow-up. Covariates were age, sex, race/ethnicity, and other tobacco use.

RESULTS: Initiation rates were 5.9% for nicotine vaping and 8.6% for cannabis vaping, at 12-month follow-up overall. Higher perceived parental knowledge was associated with lower odds of nicotine vaping initiation at 6 months (adj OR: .69; 95% CI: .50-.93) and 12 months (adj OR: .68; 95% CI: .50-.92). Similarly, higher perceived parental knowledge was associated with lower odds of cannabis vaping initiation at 6 months (adj OR: .58; 95% CI: .38-.87) and 12 months (adj OR: .53; 95% CI: .38-.74).

CONCLUSION: E-cigarette prevention efforts directed at adolescents should incorporate parent engagement strategies as a method of increasing actual and perceived parental knowledge of their child’s location, activities and peer groups.

PMID:35030966 | DOI:10.1177/08901171211061941


Source: ncbi 2

Partage le savoir
Categories: Medical

error: Content is protected !!