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Early and Late Adolescent Factors that Predict Co-use of Cannabis with Alcohol and Tobacco in Young Adulthood.

Prev Sci. 2020 Jan 20;:

Authors: D’Amico EJ, Rodriguez A, Tucker JS, Dunbar MS, Pedersen ER, Shih RA, Davis JP, Seelam R

Abstract
The changing legal landscape of cannabis in the USA has coincided with changes in how cannabis is used, including its co-use with other substances. This study analyzed 10 years of data from a diverse cohort of youth (N = 2429; 54% Hispanic, 16% Asian, 16% white, 3% black, 10% multiracial) to examine predictors in early and late adolescence of co-use of alcohol with cannabis (AC) and tobacco with cannabis (TC) at age 21. Two forms of co-use were examined: concurrent (use of both substances in past month) and sequential (use of one substance right after the other). Analyses focused on four predictor domains: individual (e.g., resistance self-efficacy), peer (e.g., time spent around peers who use), family (e.g., sibling use), and neighborhood (i.e., perceived alcohol and drug problems in neighborhood). For each co-use combination (AC or TC), we estimated parallel process piecewise latent growth models in a structural equation modeling framework using Mplus v8. The final AC and TC co-use models included all predictor variables from the four domains. Increases in positive expectancies and time spent around peers who use AC, as well as steeper decreases in resistance self-efficacy, were all related to a greater likelihood of AC co-use in young adulthood. Increases in sibling TC use and time spent around peers who use TC, as well as steeper decreases in resistance self-efficacy, were all related to a greater likelihood of TC co-use in young adulthood. Overall, findings highlight the importance of addressing peer influence in prevention programming during both early and late adolescence.

PMID: 31960260 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]


Source: ncbi 2

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