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Cannabis Use is Associated With Reduced 30-Day All-cause Readmission Among Hospitalized Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Nationwide Analysis.

J Clin Gastroenterol. 2021 Jan 20;:

Authors: Choi C, Abougergi M, Peluso H, Weiss SH, Nasir U, Pyrsopoulos N

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cannabinoid receptors are potential therapeutic targets in a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. The authors hypothesize that the use of cannabis use is associated with better control of symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study aimed to examine the utilization of inpatient services by patients with IBS who did and did not report the use of cannabis.
METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study that utilized the 2016 Nationwide Readmissions Database. Inclusion criteria included a principal diagnosis of IBS. The primary outcome was 30-day hospital readmission rates for IBS-specific causes. Secondary outcomes included the 30-day hospital readmission rates for all causes, resource utilization, and the 5 most common principal diagnoses and independent risk factors associated with readmission.
RESULTS: Of the 7163 patients with IBS identified in the National Readmission Database, 357 reported the use of cannabis. The 30-day IBS-specific readmission rates were 1.5% in patients who reported cannabis use and 1.1% in those who did not report cannabis use (P=0.53). Among the cannabis users, none of the variables evaluated served as a significant predictor of IBS-specific readmission; median income was a predictor for readmission among those who did not report cannabis use (odds ratio, 2.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-6.67; P=0.02). The 30-day readmission rates for all causes were 8.1% and 12.7% for patients who did and did not report cannabis use, respectively. After adjusting for confounders, the odds of 30-day readmission for all causes were lower among patients who reported cannabis use compared with those who did not (adjusted odds ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.99; P=0.04). The 5 most frequent diagnoses at readmission among patients who did not report cannabis use were enterocolitis because of Clostridioides difficile, IBS without diarrhea, sepsis, noninfective gastroenteritis and colitis, and acute kidney failure. By contrast, the 5 most frequent readmission diagnoses for cannabis users were cyclical vomiting, IBS with diarrhea, endometriosis, right upper quadrant abdominal pain, and nausea with vomiting. A discharge disposition of « against medical advice » was identified as an independent risk factor for 30-day hospital readmission for all causes among patients who reported cannabis use. By contrast, higher comorbidity scores and discharges with home health care were independent predictors of 30-day hospital readmission for all causes among patients who did not report cannabis use. Private insurance was an independent factor associated with lower rates of readmission for all causes among those who did not report cannabis use.
CONCLUSION: Our review of the National Readmission Database revealed no statistically significant differences in 30-day readmission rates for IBS-specific causes when comparing patients who reported cannabis use with those who did not. However, the authors found that cannabis use was associated with reduced 30-day hospital readmission rates for all causes.

PMID: 33471483 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]


Source: ncbi 2

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Categories: Medical

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