Ethn Dis. 2021 Apr 15;31(2):187-196. doi: 10.18865/ed.31.2.187. eCollection 2021 Spring.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The criminal justice system is the second largest referral source to publicly funded marijuana use disorder treatment. Individuals with criminal justice contact (being unfairly treated or abused by the police, lifetime arrest, incarceration, or parole) have reported notably high levels of stress, sleep problems, and marijuana use. There are well-known race and sex disparities in marijuana use and criminal justice contact. However, understanding is limited on the role that stressors and sleep problems contribute to marijuana use among Black adults who experience criminal justice contact.

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether life stressors and sleep problems contribute to lifetime marijuana use among Black adults with criminal justice contact and if there are sex differences.

METHODS: We performed multivariate logistic analysis, using nationally representative data of a non-institutionalized population sample (n=1508) of the National Survey of American Life from 2001 to 2003. We compared life stressors and sleep problems between Black adults with criminal justice contact who had lifetime marijuana use and those who did not have lifetime marijuana use. All analyses were stratified by sex.

RESULTS: In the sample of Black males with criminal justice contacts, individuals who reported financial stress (PR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.12-1.60) had a higher prevalence of experiencing lifetime marijuana use than Black males who reported no financial stress. Black males who reported that they were spiritual (PR: .76, 95% CI: .61-.93) had a lower prevalence of experiencing lifetime marijuana use than Black males who indicated that they were not spiritual. Black females who reported family stress (PR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.04-1.82) had a higher prevalence of experiencing lifetime marijuana use than Black females who reported no family stress.

CONCLUSIONS: These results underscore the importance of considering sex differences in life stressors when developing etiologic models of marijuana use disorder for Black adults who have experienced criminal justice contact.

PMID:33883859 | PMC:PMC8054870 | DOI:10.18865/ed.31.2.187


Source: ncbi 2

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Categories: Medical

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