Prev Med Rep. 2021 Jun 2;23:101436. doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2021.101436. eCollection 2021 Sep.

ABSTRACT

There has been a steady increase in cannabis use among US adolescents over the past decade. Perceptions of risk, specifically the belief that cannabis use is not harmful, may contribute to this increased use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate parental, school, and peer influence as protective factors in perceiving there is risk of harm from monthly cannabis use. Using the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), the study outcome was self-reported perceived risk of harm from monthly cannabis use amongst adolescents between ages 12 and 17. The exposures were parental monitoring and support, perception of school importance, extracurricular activity participation, peer attitudes towards cannabis use, and perception of peer cannabis use. Of 12,024 eligible adolescents, about 80% reported perceived risk of harm from monthly cannabis use. Multiple logistic regression models suggest the perception of risk of harm from monthly cannabis use was significantly associated with perception of peers using cannabis, perception of peers’ disapproval of cannabis use, perception of school importance, and participation in extracurricular activities. Adolescents who perceived that monthly cannabis use was risky had high parental monitoring, low perception of peer use, high perception of peers’ disapproval of cannabis use, high perception of school importance, and participated more in extracurricular activities. These findings suggest substance use prevention programs targeting adolescent attitudes and beliefs would benefit from leveraging peer influence, promoting extracurricular activities, and enhancing schoolwork to be more meaningful.

PMID:34168952 | PMC:PMC8209744 | DOI:10.1016/j.pmedr.2021.101436


Source: ncbi 2

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Categories: Medical

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