Subst Use Misuse. 2022 Mar 8:1-8. doi: 10.1080/10826084.2022.2046092. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Background: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) and cannabis (marijuana) use is rapidly increasing. Objectives: To report percentage prevalence and changes over time in current (past 30 days) e-cigarette, cannabis, and dual (concurrent) use in the population of reproductive age women (18-44 years old) in the United States. Methods: Our cross-sectional analysis involved data of 11, 004 women from Waves 1 to 3 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study (2013-2016). We estimated weighted percentage prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and changes between 2013 and 2016 in current e-cigarette, cannabis, and dual use at each wave overall and across race/ethnicity, age, education, cigarette smoking status, alcohol use, and perceived mental health. Changes were reported as p for trend. Results: Between 2013 and 2016, e-cigarette use increased 13.6% (p for trend <.001) [15.2% (95% CI:14.2, 16.2) in 2013-2014; 22.2% (95% CI: 20.2, 24.3) in 2014-2015; and 28.8% (95% CI: 26.3, 31.3) in 2015-2016]; cannabis use increased 6.2% (p for trend <.001) [23.6% (95% CI: 22.1, 25.1) in 2013-2014; 28.5% (95% CI: 26.0, 31.0) in 2014-2015; and 29.8% (95% CI: 27.9, 31.1) in 2015-2016]; and dual use declined 0.3% (p for trend <.001) [5.8% (95% CI: 5.2, 6.3) in 2013-2014; 4.8% (95% CI: 3.7, 5.8) in 2014-2015; and 5.5% (95% CI: 4.2, 6.7) in 2015-2016]. Increases and declines in prevalence varied across sociodemographic characteristics, cigarette smoking status, alcohol use, and perceived mental health. Conclusions: Continued monitoring can capture further changes in prevalence and patterns to inform targeted public health intervention programs.

PMID:35258396 | DOI:10.1080/10826084.2022.2046092


Source: ncbi 2

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