Addict Behav Rep. 2022 Apr 19;15:100430. doi: 10.1016/j.abrep.2022.100430. eCollection 2022 Jun.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Racial discrimination and cannabis use among Black emerging adults in America is a growing public health concern. However, research examining the relationship between exposure to perceived racism-based police use-of-force and cannabis use for this population is scant. This study examined the frequency of exposure (direct and indirect) to racism-based police use-of-force and its relationship with past 30-day cannabis use for a sample of Black emerging adult men and women 18-29 years of age.

METHODS: Black emerging adults (N = 300; 49% males, 51% females) in St. Louis, Missouri completed computer assisted surveys on frequency of exposure to perceived racism-based police use-of-force and cannabis use. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between frequency of exposure to perceived racism-based police use-of-force and cannabis use, controlling for covariates (sociodemographic, police contacts, and community violence).

RESULTS: Our findings revealed that females reported significantly higher rates of indirect exposure to perceived racism-based police use-of-force than males. Relative to Black females, indirect exposure to perceived racism-based police use-of-force increased the odds of cannabis use among Black males.

CONCLUSIONS: Study findings advance our understanding of the prevalence of exposure to perceived racism-based police use-of-force and its influence on cannabis use for Black emerging adults, specifically males. Results highlight the need for future research, behavioral health interventions, and policy targeting the interplay between indirect exposure to perceived racism-based police use-of-force and cannabis use.

PMID:35495418 | PMC:PMC9046117 | DOI:10.1016/j.abrep.2022.100430


Source: ncbi 2

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